Afghanistan’s Nomadic Kuchi Tribes

El Paso photographer captures images of Kuchi tribes.

While in Afghanistan I have had the pleasure of witnessing some amazing things first hand. As an El Paso photographer I have been very fortunate to have seen places that many people will never get a chance to see in person. I have had the opportunity to photograph and interact with a people who have lived virtually the same way for centuries and still remain true to their customs and way of life. These people are resilient and are able to adapt to extreme differences in climate. These people are commonly known as the Kuchi tribes; the pastoral nomads of Afghanistan.

“As an El Paso photographer I have been very fortunate to have seen places that many people will never get a chance to see in person.”

For thousands of years, and all over the world, there have been people who have migrated from one place to another in order to survive some of the harsh realities they had to face. In Afghanistan this survival technique is still a common occurrence. Year after year the Kuchi migrate from the mountainous region of Afghanistan’s Hindu – Kush Mountains, to the low-land river valleys and plains around it. Just before winter arrives in the mountains, entire families begin their trek to the warmer low lands where larger villages and towns are located in order to better support themselves and their families by trading and finding work in the more urban areas and survive the harsh mountain winters. Once winter in the mountains subsides, they make their way back to their homes where they raise livestock and plant crops of their own. Infants and elderly also make their way on trip that is sometimes measured in hundreds of miles and can take weeks to complete – one way.

 

 

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